Voter Guide

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California statewide measures: Yes on 67 and No on 65, Yes on 56Click here to view all Bay Smart measures
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Measure A1 (Alameda County)

Problem:

Housing costs in Alameda County have spiked dramatically over recent years and are now among the very highest in the nation. The median home price has risen to more than $700,000, and the average rent in the Oakland metro area has risen to nearly $2,500 per month. This affordability crisis has displaced ever-increasing numbers of families who can no longer afford to live close to where they work. As a result, homeless encampments that are a major source of Bay pollution have swollen, and workers’ longer car commutes are pouring more stormwater-borne toxins and particulate emissions into the Bay. Mass displacement also increases pressure for more sprawl into open space, including baylands, and threatens the political consensus for protecting the Bay that comes from preserving Bay access for all.

How this measure will help:

Measure A1 is a $580 million bond that will provide: $425 million for the creation and preservation of affordable rental housing, $35 million in rapid response funds to address threats of tenant displacement and opportunities for expansion of affordable units, $50 million in down payment loan assistance for middle-income working families, $45 million to help seniors, people with disabilities, and low-income homeowners pay for accessibility improvements and repairs necessary for them to remain in place, and $25 million to help develop affordable housing for purchase and assist first-time homebuyers at risk.

Endorsed by:

Greenbelt Alliance, Sierra Club San Francisco Bay Chapter, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California, East Bay Housing Organizations (EBHO), Alameda County Democratic Party, Alameda County Central Labor Council, San Francisco Foundation, East Bay Leadership Council, Bay Area Council, East Bay Times, Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Congressman Eric Swalwell, State Senator Loni Hancock, State Senator Bob Wieckowski, Assemblymember Rob Bonta, Assemblymember Bill Quirk, Assemblymember Tony Thurmond, all five Alameda County Supervisors, and dozens of other local elected officials.

Website:

http://www.affordablealameda.com/

Measure K (San Mateo County Tax)

Problem:

Housing costs in San Mateo County have spiked dramatically over recent years and are now among the very highest in the nation. The median home price has risen to more than $1 million, and average rent in the San Mateo metro area has risen to more than $3,000 per month. This affordability crisis has displaced increasing numbers of families who can no longer afford to live close to where they work. As a result, homeless encampments that are a major source of Bay pollution have swollen, and longer car commutes are pouring more stormwater-borne toxins and particulate emissions into the Bay. Mass displacement also increases pressure for more sprawl into open space, including baylands, and threatens the political consensus for protecting the Bay that comes from preserving Bay access for all.

How this measure will help:

Measure K will extend San Mateo County’s existing sales tax at its current rate for twenty years to generate $85 million annually for investments necessary to maintain county residents’ quality of life. County Supervisors have committed to prioritize Measure K funds for providing affordable homes to seniors, people with disabilities, veterans, and working families, including teachers and first responders.

Endorsed by:

Greenbelt Alliance, Sierra Club Loma Prieta Chapter, Committee for Green Foothills, Peninsula Open Space Trust, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California, Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo County, League of Women Voters of San Mateo County, San Mateo County Democratic Party, San Mateo Labor Council, SAMCEDA, San Mateo Daily Journal, Assemblymember Kevin Mullin, Assemblymember Phil Ting, all five San Mateo County Supervisors, and dozens more local officials.

Website:

http://yesonk.net/

Measure A (Santa Clara County Bond)

Problem:

Housing costs in Santa Clara County have spiked dramatically over recent years and are now among the very highest in the nation. The median home price has risen to more than $850,000, and the average rent in the San Jose metro area has risen to nearly $3,000 per month. This affordability crisis has displaced ever increasing numbers of families who can no longer afford to live close to where they work. As a result, homeless encampments that are a major source of Bay pollution have swollen, and workers’ longer car commutes are pouring more stormwater-borne toxins and particulate emissions into the Bay. Mass displacement also increases pressure for more sprawl into open space, including baylands, and threatens the political consensus for protecting the Bay that comes from preserving Bay access for all.

How this measure will help:

Measure A is a $950 million bond that will provide: $700 million to help house Santa Clara County’s most vulnerable and lowest-income populations, including permanent supportive housing for individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, $100 million to help house other low-income families, and $150 million of housing assistance for middle-income families, including first time homebuyer programs.

Endorsed by:

Greenbelt Alliance, Sierra Club Loma Prieta Chapter, Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California, Affordable Housing Network of Santa Clara County, Housing Trust Silicon Valley, Council of the Leagues of Women Voters of Santa Clara County, Santa Clara County Democratic Party, South Bay Labor Council, Silicon Valley Community Foundation, San Jose Mercury News, Congressman Mike Honda, Congresswoman Anna Eshoo, Congresswoman, Zoe Lofgren, State Senator Bob Wieckowski, State Senator Jerry Hill, State Senator Jerry Hill, State Senator Jim Beall, Assemblymember Rich Gordon, Assemblymember Kansen Chu, Assemblymember Nora Campos, Assemblymember Evan Low, Assemblymember Mark Stone, all five Santa Clara County Supervisors, and dozens more local officials.

Website:

http://yesonaffordablehousing.org/

Measure C1 (Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District)

Problem:

The East Bay has seen booming growth in recent years. This growth has attracted new businesses and over 100,000 new residents, putting enormous pressure on the area’s transportation infrastructure. Traffic is heavily congested and the public transportation system in Alameda and Contra Costa counties simply cannot meet the increased demand, forcing more people into cars for their lengthy commutes.

With more drivers on the road, residents spend more time in traffic, increasing stormwater pollution and particulate emissions that foul our Bay with toxins and greenhouse gas emissions that pollute our air and exacerbate global warming. We need a solution that will ease congestion and increase public transportation use to reduce these threats to the health of the Bay and the people who live here.

How this measure will help:

Measure C1 is a 20-year extension of a $96 annual parcel tax that is necessary to continue providing nearly $30 million per year for safe, reliable, affordable AC Transit bus service for the East Bay. It will fund improvements to this critically important East Bay public transportation system that will help accommodate increased ridership, reduce the number of cars on the road, and make our Bay cleaner and healthier.

Endorsed by:

Measure C1 is supported by a long list of elected officials and business, community, labor, and environmental groups. These include: U.S. Reps. Barbara Lee and Eric Swalwell, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, TransForm, Transport Oakland, Sierra Club San Francisco Bay Chapter, West Contra Costa League of Women Voters, United Seniors of Oakland and Alameda County, Alameda County and Contra Costa Labor Councils, East Bay Economic Development Alliance, and more.

Website:

http://www.protectactransitservices.com/

Measure B (Santa Clara County Bond)

Problem:

Santa Clara County has seen booming growth in recent years. The influx of new businesses and over 100,000 new residents has put enormous pressure on the area’s transportation infrastructure. Traffic is heavily congested and many roads are in dire need of repair. Public transportation simply cannot meet the increased demand, forcing more people into cars for increasingly long commutes.

With more drivers on the road, residents spend more time in traffic. Long-standing traffic increases stormwater pollution and particulate emissions that foul our Bay with toxins as well as greenhouse gas emissions that pollute our air and exacerbate global warming. We must take steps that will ease congestion and increase public transportation use to reduce these threats to the health of the Bay and the people who live here.

How this measure will help:

Measure B is a half-cent, 30-year sales tax that is expected to generate approximately $6 billion for transportation projects. These projects include expanding and improving BART and CalTrain, increasing bus frequency, and improving bike and pedestrian programs to close gaps and improve safety. These crucial improvements will accommodate higher demand and encourage more public transportation use, keeping cars off the road and making our Bay cleaner and healthier.

Endorsed by:

Measure B is supported by a long list of elected leaders and prominent business, environmental, labor, and community groups. These include: U .S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, all five Santa Clara County Supervisors, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, the League of Women Voters of Santa Clara County, the South Bay Labor Council, TransForm, the League of Conservation Voters of Santa Clara County, and many more.

Website:

http://yesmeasureb.com/

Measure RR (BART bond)

Problem:

Since 2010, the Bay Area has grown by more than 300,000 residents. By 2030, our population is expected to grow by nearly 30 percent. The region’s current transportation infrastructure simply cannot keep pace with increasing demand. Nowhere is this problem greater than with BART, our region’s largest public transportation system. Originally built to accommodate 100,000 riders per week, BART now is used by more than 400,000 people every day, straining its infrastructure and limiting access.

Unless we alleviate this pressure, more people will be forced into their cars. This will increase stormwater pollution and particulate emissions that damage our Bay, along with greenhouse gas emissions that worsen global warming. To keep the Bay clean and healthy, we must increase BART capacity now.

How this measure will help:

Measure RR is a $3.5 billion general obligation bond to repair and replace rails, upgrade the train control system to reduce congestion, and improve access to BART by providing more parking, disabled access, and bike stations. These are necessary upgrades to our region’s public transportation system, helping to meet ridership demand and keep more cars off the road.

Endorsed by:

Measure RR is supported by a long list of elected officials and prominent business, environmental, labor, and community groups. These include: U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the Bay Area Council, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, TransForm, the League of Women Voters Bay Area, several Carpenters’ and Laborers’ Local Unions, Transport Oakland, SPUR, Sierra Club Bay Area Chapter, and many more.

Website:

http://www.yesforbart.com/

Measures J & K (San Francisco)

Problem:

Homelessness is arguably the most serious crisis facing San Francisco. Among the many challenges that homelessness poses, homeless encampments are a major source of trash, toxic pollution, and bacterial contamination flowing into the Bay. Funding is badly needed for temporary housing, mental health and substance abuse services, and resource centers. Additionally, upgrades to the city’s transportation infrastructure are overdue and badly needed to reduce car use and the stormwater pollution and particulate emissions it adds to the Bay. More revenue is required for these important investments to make roads safer and public transit more accessible.

How this measure will help:

Measures J and K work together to increase funding for transportation improvements and homeless assistance. Measure K calls for a 0.75 percent general sales tax increase for 25 years, expected to generate approximately $150 million per year for the General Fund. Measure J establishes new funds and allocation requirements to provide roughly $100 million per year for transportation programs (MUNI equity and affordability; transit maintenance and expansion) and $50 million per year for homeless programs. According to SPUR, these funds would prioritize services that benefit underserved and disadvantaged communities. The San Francisco Chronicle writes that Measure K is necessary if the city is serious about addressing its housing crisis.

Endorsed by:

Urban Habitat, SPUR, TransForm, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, San Francisco Democratic Party, Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club, Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club, San Francisco Women’s Political Caucus San Francisco Labor Council, San Francisco Rising, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Bay Guardian, State Senator Mark Leno, Mayor Ed Lee and eight of eleven Supervisors.

Website:

http://yesonjandk.com/

Measure KK (Oakland)

Problem:

Oakland’s road infrastructure is crumbling, costing residents hundreds of dollars each year in car repairs due to potholes and bad roads. These bad roads also create significant liability for the city and worsen traffic congestion, ultimately adding to the stormwater pollution and particulate emissions fouling our Bay. The lack of affordable housing has exacerbated homeless encampments, which are a major source of trash, toxic pollution, and bacterial contamination flowing into Bay waters. The high cost of housing has also displaced many low- and middle-income residents from their homes, and their increasingly long commutes now contribute more to Bay pollution. Upgrades and maintenance are badly needed for important community hubs like libraries and community centers that are critical to maintain the quality of life for city residents.

How this measure will help:

Measure KK is a $600 million bond that would fund investments in Oakland’s roads, community resources, and housing. Of that amount, some $350 million would go to repaving and repairing streets and sidewalks and improving bicycle safety. About $100 million would be invested in acquiring, preserving, and building affordable homes. And approximately $150 million would go to improve libraries and parks, and upgrade public safety buildings and fire stations. Greenbelt Alliance notes that Measure KK would help prevent sprawl and relieve development pressure on open space and agricultural lands in the region. The San Francisco Chronicle calls Measure KK “focused and practical.”

Endorsed by:

League of Conservation Voters of the East Bay, Asian Pacific Environmental Network, Trust for Public Land, Transform, SPUR, Bike East Bay, League of Women Voters of Oakland, Transport Oakland, Alameda County Democratic Party, Alameda County Labor Council, East Bay Housing Organizations (EBHO), Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Supervisor Wilma Chan, Assemblymember Rob Bonta, Assemblymember Tony Thurmond, Mayor Libby Schaaf and seven of eight Oakland City Councilmembers, the San Francisco Chronicle, and many others.

Website:

http://www.yesonkkforoakland.com

Measure T1 (Berkeley)

Problem:

The City of Berkeley has identified $300 million in necessary maintenance to the city’s core public infrastructure. Parks and roads are in need of upgrades, while building improvements are needed to increase energy and water use efficiency. As a shoreline community, Berkeley is especially vulnerable to impacts from earthquakes and sea level rise, and is seeking to address these challenges in ways that enhance the environment.

How this measure will help:

Measure T1 is a $100 million bond for improvements to vital infrastructure including streets and sidewalks, storm drains, parks and recreation centers, and the city’s public buildings. The measure places an emphasis on the utilization of green infrastructure, such as rain gardens and permeable pavement that will help to filter pollutants from urban runoff before it can pollute local creeks and the Bay. It also provides opportunities for rainwater capture and reuse that will help address the city’s water needs as the climate changes.

Endorsed by:

League of Women Voters, Berkeley City Council, Mayor Tom Bates and the entire Berkeley City Council, Jim McGrath (Regional Water Quality Control Board member), Berkeley Democratic Club, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Sierra Club, and others.

Website:

http://www.berkeleyfuture.com

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Paid for by Save the Bay Action Fund Committee to Support Proposition 67 and Save the Bay.